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I thought I would go over these just in case people are having questions with these and provide a few tips, if others have additional tips feel free to include them.

There are three types of Torque wrenches dial, analog, and digital.

The Dial torque wrenches use a dial to display what your torque value is, this means you have to look at the dial as you are torquing the fastener.

ctrp-1111-04-o+torque-wrench-myths+beam-

Then you have the analog torque wrenches, they have numbers around a bottom ring as well as an escalating scale length wise. you simple unlock the handle with either a screw or a ring and then twist the handle to the desired setting. the way you read this style is you add the last number on the vertical scale to the number that is on the ring to get the setting. When you reach the torque you set the head will click. When storing these types of torque wrenches you always want to set them to their lowest setting to preserve their calibration.

image_15904.jpg

Finally there is the digital torque wrench which you set electronically and when you reach the setting while tightening the fastener it will vibrate to signal the setting.

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I have more I will add later, the wife needs this computer to do her homework.

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i had never use the last two before,. but i know the one with the dials. it was my best'est friend when i redid my engine :lol:

which of the three would you recommend,. in terms of service length and reliability?

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I like the digital because it self calibrates each time you power it up and you don't have to convert from different scales, just make sure you are on the correct scale when setting. Anyone who was in a math class and realized their calculator was in Deg instead of Rad will know the frustration.

Also corrosion can get inside your torque wrench so it is recommended that you "break" the torque wrench. for the analog that means you turn it until it clicks 2-3 times before actually using it, the other two you just use them but take three readings.

When measuring with a torque wrench you use a smooth continuous motion a jerky motion will give a false positive.

I thought I had more to say about them but I lost my train of thought.

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I've only used the dial and analog torque wrenches and seen other people used the fancy digital torque wrench. When it comes to reliability, I heard the digital can break or go bad easier but I haven't confirmed that yet. The analog can go bad too, I know I've had a few bad ones when I used those in classes. I assume the dial one is the most reliable due to its practically. I owned and like the analog one because it comes a wide range of torque where I can nicely hear a click noise when I reached my torque tightening the wheels.

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Depending on what you're using it for, there are a few other torque-indicating or torque-limiting devices.

For example, there are torque-limiting impact extensions which are designed for tightening lug nuts, and will get you within about 5 ft-lbs of the torque value you want (and quickly).

I've also seen torque read-out adapters that work with any socket wrench, i.e.:

940758-digital-torque-adapter.jpg

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I remember what I was going to say, if you use an adapter that lengthens or alters the angle of the torque wrench you need to use this formula.

M1 = M2 x L1 / L2


Where:


M1 is the torque setting of the wrench.


M2 is the actual torque applied to the nut


L1 is the normal length of the wrench


L2 is the extended length of the wrench

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:mellow: darn,.. i have to put out my notes for this,..

ike621,. you shall be my professor in tools, and i shall call you professor ike621,.. :lol:

(raising hands) could i be excused?? :mellow: my head hurts,.. :P LOL

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After having sheared some important bolts off after my analogue "clicker" type failed, I am now a bit distrustful of using them. When I do use one, I have to use the feel of plausibility to make sure that it is working properly.

And yes I followed the instructions, like making sure you "click" it a few times before use, and wind the handle back to zero after use so as not to distort the spring by leaving under pressure for long periods.

It's hard for the dial type to be telling you lies....

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so is the dial type much more reliable? IMO the other torque wrench are a bit complicated by design,. and simple is much more reliable

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I know most mechanics I have seen only use the turn and dial wrenches but have the more expensive ones. The dial ones I have heard are junk. I have a decent one from craftsman that goes to 140 Ft Ibs I think. Also use the smaller Ft Ibs one from Harbor Freight and the Inch Ibs one from Harbor Freight. Have not had problems.

TomK

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I use an analog. I've had it for years and years (at least 6-7 years now) and it has never failed to accurately torque anything. When I store it I remove all tension. I've torqued from 15ft/lbs torque, 25ft/lb and just lately (axle nuts) 180ft/lb. The trick with the analog is storing it properly. Remove all tension (set it to Zero) and most importantly...DON'T DROP IT!

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I have been using the analog torque wrenches for 11 years in the Air Force and we send them off to be calibrated so we can see how far off they really are, I haven't seen one out more than tolerance would allow.

Another tip that I wanted to make is get the torque wrench that is correct for the job. Don't use one that the torque setting is in the extreme regions of the torque wrench, if the torque value you need is 100 foot pounds for example don't use a torque wrench that goes from 1-100 foot pounds try finding one that puts the value in the middle 50% range. In this example the 1-100 foot pounds torque wrench you would want to only use the 25-75 foot pounds range, in a pinch use it but if you have the ability to use a larger or smaller torque wrench you should.

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Good advice Ike621.

I have two different torque wrenches. My big one that can get close to 300ft/lbs. I have a smaller one (1/4") that measures in in/lbs for smaller nuts and bolts. Granted I rarely use my 1/4" unit, I'm always torquing 12+mm bolts.

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I have the northern tool analog torque wrench and it goes up around 275lbs/ft (I think, too lazy to check). For some reason, I couldn't twist it up past 220lbs/ft, it just keeps getting tighter and tighter as I go up(that's what he saids)

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I have the northern tool analog torque wrench and it goes up around 275lbs/ft (I think, too lazy to check). For some reason, I couldn't twist it up past 220lbs/ft, it just keeps getting tighter and tighter as I go up(that's what he saids)

That's what he said? I guess I'm not one to judge :P

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