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Hei Ignition Modification


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I have a question (i dont have this problem) (yet) but why cant we just replace the dizzy instead of wiring all this shit up? My buddy did it on his probe it worked however it takes awhile to get everything right lol i use premium gas in my 96 626 (klde) 5speed and since ive owned it and put 93 in it made a huge difference

This first post here gives you the background why this modification is VERY common in the probe/mx6/626 world: http://mazda626.net/topic/16070-hei-ignition-module-modificationinstallation/#entry143397 although its missing some pictures :(

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  • 5 months later...
  • 5 months later...

did the hei conversion on my fs 2.0, the car run smoothly... my car had problem with the distributor n i change to the bp08 distributor...it was going well til the car started jerking again.... did my hei conversion n currently using an ignition coil from the mazda rx7 rotory engine

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  • 10 months later...

I just want to say that I've done this modification on my girlfriend's 1994 Mazda 626 LX with a 2.5 Litre V-6 and automatic tranny. The conversion was performed over a year ago and it truly breathed new life into this old car. The car got hot once several years ago and after that, it had an intermittent miss at an idle. On hotter days (I live in Florida USA) it would occasionally cause the car to stall. I chased my tale for over a year trying to figure out what was causing this problem. Plug wires are very important on these cars as oil spilled into the spark plug wells can get on the wires and cause a short which makes the engine miss. I purchased wires with a lifetime warranty and have returned them several times to keep the wires fresh. anyhow, the miss at an idle persisted.

Someone with a buddy who owned a probe mentioning this issue led me to this forum. By the time I figured it out, OEM replacement parts were no longer available and the only alternative seemed to be a rebuilt distributor. At $400 that seemed like a rip off and I felt the problem would not be fixed by simply replacing what I saw as flawed engineering. Indeed, inside the distributor where heat and vibration exist is no place for delicate electronics like the ignitor. Not a great place for a coil which produces heat of it's own as well. Thanks Mazda/Ford for a very compact engine design but this was a mistake. A recall of some year's distributors and a redesign a few years later proves the point.

Follow the instructions in this thread to find ignition nirvana for your 626 / Millinea / probe / whatever else came with this great little powerplant. also check the probe talk forum. and whoever the guy who figured this out.  I remember reading the original thread over on Probe forum, can't recall his name, but he was still answering questions on the modification after he had sold his own car. You sir are a genius!!! and helped so many people you've never even met.

Anyhow, the module was purchased for a 1985 Chevy Capprice or some such. Just find any model GM with the HEI ignition. At this writing, the modules have increased in price to about $30. I fabricated a little sheet metal bracket mounted to the inner fender well to mount the module. I used an Accel chrome performance coil (about $30) which was the only point of failure so far. The original coil (purchased new at the time) went belly up about three months after install. I had my concerns at the time about it being up to the task of sparking an HEI ignition but after replacing it with another of the same coils, now believe it was just a defective coil. Take your time creating the new wiring harness, use good connectors and wire as this modification is likely to last years. I made a cap from a stock cap by grinding a notch in the cap on top where the old coil lead was and attaching a coil wire then epoxy. Be careful here as well because spark scatter gave me fits as well until one day it got dark as I worked and I could see the spark scatter in the dark. Good Luck fellow gear heads!!!

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  • 3 months later...

Hellow guys,eish i have a ford telster 2L 96model in S.Africa i bought this car with no fuse and i bought all these stuff and i fix it back bt the problem no spark is coming,hy please im asking for same 1 with idear and knwoledge what can i do or bought to get it right...if yu are willing to help conduct me..brightmarume5@gmail.com thank yu in advance..

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  • 9 months later...

I just want to say that I've done this modification on my girlfriend's 1994 Mazda 626 LX with a 2.5 Litre V-6 and automatic tranny. The conversion was performed over a year ago and it truly breathed new life into this old car. The car got hot once several years ago and after that, it had an intermittent miss at an idle. On hotter days (I live in Florida USA) it would occasionally cause the car to stall. I chased my tale for over a year trying to figure out what was causing this problem. Plug wires are very important on these cars as oil spilled into the spark plug wells can get on the wires and cause a short which makes the engine miss. I purchased wires with a lifetime warranty and have returned them several times to keep the wires fresh. anyhow, the miss at an idle persisted.

Someone with a buddy who owned a probe mentioning this issue led me to this forum. By the time I figured it out, OEM replacement parts were no longer available and the only alternative seemed to be a rebuilt distributor. At $400 that seemed like a rip off and I felt the problem would not be fixed by simply replacing what I saw as flawed engineering. Indeed, inside the distributor where heat and vibration exist is no place for delicate electronics like the ignitor. Not a great place for a coil which produces heat of it's own as well. Thanks Mazda/Ford for a very compact engine design but this was a mistake. A recall of some year's distributors and a redesign a few years later proves the point.

Follow the instructions in this thread to find ignition nirvana for your 626 / Millinea / probe / whatever else came with this great little powerplant. also check the probe talk forum. and whoever the guy who figured this out.  I remember reading the original thread over on Probe forum, can't recall his name, but he was still answering questions on the modification after he had sold his own car. You sir are a genius!!! and helped so many people you've never even met.

Anyhow, the module was purchased for a 1985 Chevy Capprice or some such. Just find any model GM with the HEI ignition. At this writing, the modules have increased in price to about $30. I fabricated a little sheet metal bracket mounted to the inner fender well to mount the module. I used an Accel chrome performance coil (about $30) which was the only point of failure so far. The original coil (purchased new at the time) went belly up about three months after install. I had my concerns at the time about it being up to the task of sparking an HEI ignition but after replacing it with another of the same coils, now believe it was just a defective coil. Take your time creating the new wiring harness, use good connectors and wire as this modification is likely to last years. I made a cap from a stock cap by grinding a notch in the cap on top where the old coil lead was and attaching a coil wire then epoxy. Be careful here as well because spark scatter gave me fits as well until one day it got dark as I worked and I could see the spark scatter in the dark. Good Luck fellow gear heads!!!

You happen to have any pics?

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  • 7 months later...

A much easier solution is, to install a J885 ignition module instead of the original J888 module. 

You can't buy a J888 module separately, but the J885 you can.

It's almost plug and play. Just needs a small mod. to the coil terminal.

i have done this mod. on my mx6 and it runs flawless.

 

original:

2013-05-16+20_13_47.jpg

 

replacement:

2013-05-16+10_36_39.jpg

 

The red stripe, indicates the coil terminal modification.

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I had one those modules go bad. The whole point I'm wanting to do is remove as much heat as I can from inside there

I'm an electrical engineer and at my company we use very similar mosfets as the ignition driver in power meters. The utility reads the meters remotely using a power line carrier signal. Our problem is heat too. After one minute of transmitting, they can hit 120 degrees c. Some of our more reliable models use tiny little heatsinks that almost look like forks on multiple, small mosfets. Other models just use a block of aluminum. You can't change the number of mosfets but you could probably rig a better heatsink. Our meters are sealed so there isn't any airflow in there but we're still able to dissipiate the heat from a 25w transmitter. Just make sure you use heatsink paste. A good place to start might be a PC memory or chipset heatsink. You might even be able to scrap one out of an old PC. Aluminum would be fine but copper would be most effective.

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Interesting idea, although airflow can introduce moisture and condensation.

The easiest thing to do is just buy a new aftermarket distributor. They are perhaps $150 with upgraded internals and lifetime warranty.

Where do you find lifetime one for that cheap? Even with them theres no guarantee they'll last any longer. Still the same issues with heat

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Interesting idea, although airflow can introduce moisture and condensation.

The easiest thing to do is just buy a new aftermarket distributor. They are perhaps $150 with upgraded internals and lifetime warranty.

Where do you find lifetime one for that cheap? Even with them theres no guarantee they'll last any longer. Still the same issues with heat

 

 

The one I had on my MX-6 was made by RPT (Richporter Technologies), and I found them through eBay.  They claimed the distributor had all upgraded components, including higher-grade bearings, and higher temperature grade electronics.  It came with a new cap and rotor, too.  I RMA'd it once under warranty, but it turned out the distributor wasn't the problem, but that my (not very old) spark plug wires had failed.  They overnighted the replacement one before I sent the old one back, so great cust. service, too.

 

I think I paid around $150 at the time (3 or 4 years ago).

 

Heck, I just looked, new "standard grade" aftermarket ones are all over eBay (with like 10 year or lifetime warranties) for $50-$80 shipped!  They also have just the ICM for around $50...but why not get a whole new assembly?

 

I paid more for a supposedly upgraded part, similar to this:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-FORD-MAZDA-626-PROBE-IGNITION-DISTRIBUTOR-2-5L-V6-DOHC-MX-6-MX-3-TOT57271-/271331151814?hash=item3f2c98cfc6:g:XNYAAOSwrklVExks&vxp=mtr

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  • 2 weeks later...

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