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Found 2 results

  1. So, I am in the midst of massing parts for my GC suspension swap, Going for GE '97 spec. I managed to find an LX 626 with a dead engine and bought the entire running gear; struts, knuckles, brakes, rear trailing arms, and front cv shafts. More on that conversion as it takes shape. So I got to thinking, how can I refinish these calipers? They were rusty: I don't have a sandblaster, and a dremel or wire brush was going to take forever and a day. And 17 years of rust and elements had had their way with these brakes. They still operated freely, but the car they came from was driven on gravel roads a lot. I found this at Canadian Tire: So I bought two bottles and decided to give it a try. It is apparently environmentally safe, and I can confirm it doesn't harm rubber seals. But at $11/bottle, it's not exactly cheap. It has a soapy water texture. So here is the setup: I put the two rear calipers into the solution, and left them for a day. It was already pretty cold here when I started this experiment, and there is no heat in my garage. I was skeptical at first, but the cold temperature didn't stop this from happening: As the solution works, it becomes black. Over the next 2 weeks or so, I shifted the calipers around to get them as submerged as possible, doing one at a time. I didn't take any pictures during this phase, but by the time the solution was black, the calipers were still a bit rusty on the parts that hadn't been submerged as long. So I bought two more bottles of Evapo-Rust, and after a couple more days individual soaking, the calipers looked like this: I'd just finished wire brushing the dried caliper, but I decided to wipe the wet one with a rag instead of letting it dry, and that also worked. The left bracket was only submerged during the last part of the first batch, you can see the difference vs. fresh solution: After re-dipping the left bracket and the e-brake cable mount ends: So now these look like brand f'n new! Now it's time to get them painted... More to come
  2. Egr Valve

    I have a Mazda 626 V6 with a EGR Valve problem. The code for it shows up in an inspection. The research I've done tells me that I can clean the EGR and/or the Throttle Body. There have been some great discussions with great photo's. Some seem to intermix the term EGR valve with TB. I've seen the photos of the Trottle Body, which I can find on my car, but I really haven't seen good photos or info of the EGR Valve, which I understand can also be cleaned. Can anyone clarify this for me or provide a photo of the EGR Valve itself. Thank you.