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About sinfini1225

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  1. Please help i went to smog my 88 626 and failed california function test they said they cant find the timing marks but i found something about an ECU and my check engine light is not on if my timing were off this would be on i think im not sure please help This is what i found online about this function test PART 3. Functional Inspection The final part of the entire smog test process is the functional inspection. The functional inspection is conducted by the smog technician and is hands-on. The smog technician will ensure proper operation of the following emissions components and systems. A. Engine Ignition Timing B. Check Engine Light C. Gas Cap & Filler NeckD. Exhaust Recirculation Valve (EGR)E. Fuel EVAP Test (LPFET) A. Engine Ignition Timing Your vehicle's engine ignition timing will be inspected during the smog test. The smog technician will ensure ignition timing is set properly, and the system is supplying electric current to the sparkplugs at the correct intervals. Spark, 15,000 to 20,000 volts, is created at the engine's ignition coil. Electricity is delivered to the coil, a spark is generated, then sent to the distributor. It is the distributors responsibility to route the spark to the correct spark plug, at the correct time. The timing inspection will ensure the distributor is sending spark plug energy at the exact moment required for optimum air/fuel combustion. Adjusting a vehicle's ignition timing is performed by rotating the distributor clockwise or counterclockwise direction as needed. Failed Ignition Timing: Engine ignition timing is measured in degrees. An ignition timing failure for example; ignition timing is required to be set at 15 degrees Before Top Dead Center (BTDC) and instead is set to 10 After Top Dead Center (ATDC). This fault will cause a functional failure, as well as increase Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. California's emissions standards allow timing to be up to 3 degrees +/- off the manufacturer's required setting; resetting is recommend. One or two degrees off will not cause your vehicle to fail the ignition timing inspection. Electronic Ignition Timing: Some late model vehicles may not have an ignition distributor, and therefore no timing adjustment or testing of the ignition system is required. On these engines, timing is controlled electronically by the Engine Control Unit, also known as the ECU, and the camshaft sensor and/or crankshaft sensor. Both the crankshaft and camshaft sensors send vital data to the ECU indicating the position of the engine pistons, thus allowing the ECU to send spark to the proper cylinder at the exact moment fuel and air mixture is at it's optimum pressurization. Any electronic ignition timing fault will automatically illuminate the check engine light, service engine soon light, or malfunction indictor lamp. Note the last part my check engine light is not on am i being scammed ?