TurboMike

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  1. http://www.wscc.org/flyers/2012BunnyRunFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance night rally on Saturday, 04/28/12. Registration from 5pm to 6:30, drivers meeting at 6:30, first car off at 7pm. Novice meeting at 6:15, these are HARD trick rallies. Cars leave in 1 minute intervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), a small light like an LED so the nav can read the instructions and write, and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophies for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn’t handle.
  2. In ProvidentBank Baseball Stadium (home of Rockland Boulders) in Pomona NY: 5 min from Tappan Zee Bridge off Palisades Pkway This is a small lot, so low speeds but technical. Only $40 per driver (max two drivers per car). Flier: http://www.wscc.org/flyers/AX2012-04-15-Flyer.pdf
  3. Tsd Night Rally In Mount Kisco Ny Saturday 11/19

    Funny story: Few years ago I wrote a rally. I was the guy at the last checkpoint who took your paperwork and told you how to get to the nearest highway or the bar we were all meeting at. A car comes in "hey did that miata come in?? we saw them pulled over with the top down and pulled next to them but they were screaming at each other so we drove off". Another car comes in "hey did that red miata come in? they were in front of us and they pulled over and a girl got out of the pass side and made the guy driving get out and go to the pass side and was yelling at him". A few hours later, I'm at the bar listening to ralliests telling me about the joys and pains of the rally. Hot chick comes in with a big bag, yells at someone "who is the rally master guy" and they point at me. She comes over, hands me her paperwork "we didnt find the last checkpoint, so here is the paperwork" i start the "gee that sucks I heard you were right near the end too..." speech. She cuts me off "I just broke up with my boyfriend, where is the bathroom in this joint?". I point, she goes. She comes out in a sexy little tight dress, I assume her jeans and tshirt is in the bag now, and walks out. I see her out the window jump into the red miata and take off. D'oh!
  4. Tsd Night Rally In Mount Kisco Ny Saturday 11/19

    Yeah but on the flip side we've also had people that never even finished their first few rallies (I think I never finished the first four I did when i started 10 years ago) and never come back. Sometimes people get lost after five instuctions only a few miles into the rally and give up and go home. Some people are over an hour into the rally and only a few instructions to the last checkpoint and get so lost they cant backtrack to even figure out how to get back on course and wind up giving up. So some people get pissed and dont come back, some people are hooked to the challenge and cant wait for the next rally.
  5. Tsd Night Rally In Mount Kisco Ny Saturday 11/19

    I've been in rallies like that. Actually the driving in a rally like that is even more boring than navigating. You go less than the speed limit and never miss a turn because its so easy and the navi is constantly doing math to tell you to speed up or slow down after each turn. You never get lost and most expert teams hit each checkpoint within a second. Our rallies are more like anarchy. Its a trick rally so the turns are very ambiguous and the clues hard to find, so you're guaranteed to make wrong turns. Both driver and navigator have to keep a sharp eye out. We dont have a checkpoint every 10 min, we usually only have 2 or 3 in each rally, so you have a long time to correct mistakes. We also hide signs all along the rally with symbols on them that the navi has to write down and you're scored on it. I've both driven and navigated rallies where for the next week as I'm driving I keep staring at the side of the road at waist level looking for a symbol. I've had expert rally teams who are used to the other kind of rally, complain about ours. "Where is the structure!" "My rally computer is useless in this type of rally!" etc. Ours is more about crazy driving to fix mistakes and arguing with your navigator about each turn. :)
  6. http://www.wscc.org/flyers/2011TurkeyTourFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance night rally on Saturday, 11/19/11. Registration from 5pm to 6:30, drivers meeting at 6:30, first car off at 7pm. Cars leave in 1 minute intervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), a small light like an LED so the nav can read the instructions and write, and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophys for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn’t handle.
  7. WSCC is having an autocross in the new baseball stadium parking lot in Pomona (part of Ramapo/near TZ bridge) this Sunday 10/30. Flier: http://www.wscc.org/flyers/AX-2011-10-30-Flyer.pdf You can pre-register at motorsportsreg.com website: http://www.motorsportreg.com/index.cfm/event/event.advert/uidEvent/17EE1736-E88B-C1C3-48FF16EF3E1E9DC9 Next(last of year) event is a TSD rally in MtKisco on 11/19.
  8. Autox In Pomona/ramapo On Sunday 10/16

    We havent had an autox site since 2005 and now we have this small one and are working on two others. So hopefully we're around for a while.
  9. WSCC having an autocross in the new baseball stadium parking lot in Pomona (part of Ramapo/near TZ bridge) this Sunday 10/16. Flier: http://www.wscc.org/flyers/AX-2011-10-16.pdf You can pre-register on the website: http://www.wscc.org Next(last of year) autox at same location on 10/30. TSD rally in MtKisco on 11/19.
  10. http://www.wscc.org/flyers/2010TurkeyTourFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance night rally on Saturday, 11/20/10. Registration from 5pm to 6:30, drivers meeting at 6:30, first car off at 7pm. Cars leave in 1 minute intervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), a small light like an LED so the nav can read the instructions and write, and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophys for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn
  11. http://www.wscc.org/flyers/2010HarvestFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance night rally on Sunday, 10/09/10. Starts at GrandPrix NewYork Go-Karts. Registration from 5pm to 6:30, drivers meeting at 6:30, first car off at 7pm. Cars leave in 1 minute intervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), a small light like an LED so the nav can read the instructions and write, and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophys for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn
  12. http://www.wscc.org/flyers/2008TurkeyTourFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance NIGHT rally on Saturday, 11/22. Registration from 5 to 6:15, drivers meeting at 6:30, first car off at 7pm. Cars leave in 1 minute invtervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophys for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn
  13. http://wscc.org/flyers/2007TurkeyTourFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance NIGHT rally on Saturday, 11/17/07. Registration from 5 to 6:15, drivers meeting at 6:30, first car off at 7pm. Cars leave in 1 minute invtervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophys for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn
  14. http://wscc.org/flyers/2007HalloweenRallyFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance NIGHT rally on Saturday, 10/20/07. Registration from 5 to 6pm, drivers meeting at 6:30, first car off at 7pm. Cars leave in 1 minute invtervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), some kind of light so the navigator can see without blinding the driver's view out the windshield, a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophys for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn
  15. http://wscc.org/flyers/2007SummerRallyFlyer.pdf TimeSpeedDistance DAYTIME rally on Sunday, 08/26/07. Registration from Noon to 12:30, drivers meeting at 12:30, first car off at 1pm. Cars leave in 1 minute invtervals from your car number, so first come first start. Should be about 2-4 hours (usually 3ish). You need TWO people (driver and navigator), and $20 per car ($10 each). Recommended: a pen, something to write on on the nav's lap (like a clipboard), a basic calculator (or a nav who likes math), and a watch/clock with seconds that you can easily reset to the rallymaster's time. Rally computers, GPS systems, and lights above headlight level not allowed. Trophys for the winners of each class. What is it? A TimeSpeedDistance (TSD) rally has an "average speed" that you should follow through the rally. Its set BELOW the speed limit. The rally instructions are very tricky and you're looking for stuff at night (ie: make 3rd left after the word "STRINGS", or make second acute right, etc) so you're going to make a few bad turns. After you figure out you're in the wrong place you have to backtrack to the correct turn without getting lost, then speed up to get back to your "average speed" (where you would be if you didnt get lost). There are hidden signs along the course you need to mark down, and hidden checkpoints where you pull over and they record what time you came in. Points are given for every second early or late to each checkpoint, and for each sign missed or put out of order. Lowest points win. So questions like "is this illegal" or "dude this is awesome I'm gona go 175mph" or "wont we all get arrested" are silly since thats not what the rally is about. Some people do it in minivans with their kids in the backseat helping look for turns. If you make a wrong turn or get lost, its up to you if you choose you catch up slowly and safely and risk hitting a checkpoint and getting lots of points, or if you drive like an ass and risk getting pulled over by a cop or taking risks so you can make up time as quickly as possible and get a better score. There will be mostly twisty hilly backroads where you probably will never see a cop, but they are also public roads and you take any risks on your own. I can guaranty you will enjoy them a lot more in a sports car "taking a few risks" than a minivan full of kids tho. Some people will choose to have a nice ride down some twisty windy backroads in the dark, some people will get way lost and come into checkpoints late and gets lots of points, and some people will choose to drive in a manner to make up time each time they get lost and have a blast down some twicked roads. Its all up to the drivers. The roads are awesome and usually including some dirt and gravel roads, but nothing a lowered car couldn