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How To Drain The Coolant Fluid?!


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#1
shay

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After Considering the costs of servicing the coolant fluid for my 626 (2001 2.0) – I have decided to do it on my own.
First is the regular 50/50 antifreeze coolant sold in any store is sufficient?
or does the 626 require different coolant
Second how do I drain the fluid from the radiator? Is there a draining valve that needs to be opened?
And third just to make sure – there is no coolant filter (or is there) that needs to replaced?
Thanks in advance for all the advices.

#2
Trebuchet03

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There is a drain petcock on the lower left (driver's side) of the radiator... It's just a plastic valve you unscrew (you dont have to take it completely off)... There is a little plastic door that pops open to make drainage easier. Once you're under there - you will see it :biggrin:

Once you have drained the coolant (as best you can). Take a hose and push some water through the radiator cap (and out the drain) -- this will flush out some of the stuff in there.

Refill with water (or flush fluid if you want - I just use water :P ), turn the car back on - turn the heater on and let it cycle for few minutes (once the car is warm). Then, let it cool off again, drain the water, add coolant. Start the car (with radiator cap open) and top off when you see the fluid drop. When the fluid starts to rise, put the cap back on ;)

--
No, there is no coolant filter. You can use the pre-mixed stuff if you want. But if you want to save a few dollars, you can buy coolant that you have to mix yourself (which really is no big deal).

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To general - it is important to service your coolant every now and then. The internals (especially water pump) are dependent on the lubricants that are added to the coolant. Over time, the coolant becomes acidic and that wears away internal components -- water pumps and hoses do not like this :mellow:

#3
shay

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thanks for the fast reply -
Now about the coolant, they say that there is a pink coolant and there is a green coolant.
What is the difference anyway?
Is the regular 50/50 coolant sufficient?

#4
shay

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By the way - how many gallons of coolant should I prepare?

#5
twiggy144

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2 gallons. If you buy one gallon concentrate, and mix 50/50 with water, you will have your 2 gallons.

#6
ScottyRS

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thanks for the fast reply -
Now about the coolant, they say that there is a pink coolant and there is a green coolant.
What is the difference anyway?
Is the regular 50/50 coolant sufficient?


I've read a few things about the pink coolant eating away at gaskets and such. Of course, I've never seen anything credible to back it up. The green stuff, however, has been around forever. And so far, so good.

Also, if you mix the coolant yourself, mix it with distilled water (About $1 for a gallon at your local grocery store). Distilled water doesn't have any minerals in it, and thus dissipates heat better.

#7
97Mazda

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Just to add to the good advice already given.....to properly drain (and flush) the entire system, remove the lower rad hose and the oil cooler hoses (otherwise you'll never completely drain the block)

#8
bchiu

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Just to add to the good advice already given.....to properly drain (and flush) the entire system, remove the lower rad hose and the oil cooler hoses (otherwise you'll never completely drain the block)



Hi 97Mazda, I understand why you need to remove the lower rad hose but why the oil cooler hoses? I thought the oil cooler hoses just contain tranny fluid inside and not coolant?

Regards,
Brian

#9
97Mazda

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Not the tranny oil cooler...the engine oil cooler (above the oil filter).

Sorry....only applys to the V6!




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