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626/mx6/probe Faq


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#1
blackshine007

blackshine007

    Mazda 626.net

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  • Car: 1994 626 LX KLZE
I found my info lingering around on a site that's probly about 2 or 3 years old and haven't closed down yet.....




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Torque Specs & Useful Technical Data


Torque Specs

Ignition Area:
Distributor Cap torque bolts - 19-25Nm, 14-18lb/ft.
Spark Plug Torque - 15-22Nm, 11-16lb/ft with engine cold (hot aluminium tears)
Exhaust Area
Exhaust stud tightening torque - 2.5V6 - 19-25Nm, 14-18lb/ft in 2-3 steps
Exhaust stud tightening torque - 2.0I4 - 20-28Nm, 14-18lb/ft (Nut), 16-22Nm, 12-16lb/ft) (Bolt) in 2-3 steps

Coolant Area
Block Drain, right side of 2.5V6 engine - 19-25Nm, 14-18lb/ft
Thermostat bolt 19-25Nm, 14-18lb/ft
Water (Fan) Thermosensor - 16-23Nm, 12-17lb/ft

Oil Area
Oil Pressure Sender - 11.8-17.7Nm
Oil Filter Torque - 14-17Nm
Oil Pan Drain Plug - Nm
MTX Drain & Fill Plug - 40-58Nm, 29-43lb/ft

Airbox Area
Fresh Air Duct across radiator - 7.8-10.7Nm; 10mm skt
Airbox bolts & nuts - 19-25Nm, 14-18lb/ft; 12mm skt

Seat Belt Area
Seat Belt Anchoring Points - 38-54Nm, 28.2-29.8lb/ft

Wheel Area
Wheel lug nut - 89-117Nm, 66-87lb/ft
Front & Rear Suspension Strut Bottom Two Cross Bolts - 94-116Nm, 69-86lb/ft; 19mm skt
Front & Rear Antiroll Bar Linkage Nuts & Bracket Nuts/Bolts - 37-53Nm, 27-39lb/ft
Front & Rear ABS Sensor lead strut bracket - 16-22Nm, 12-16lb/ft
Front Calliper Guide bolts - 44-49Nm, 33-36lb/ft
Rear Calliper Guide bolts - 34-39Nm, 25-29lb/ft
Front Calliper Bracket bolts - 78-102Nm, 58-74lb/ft
Rear Calliper Bracket bolts - 45-67Nm, 33-49lb/ft
Front & Rear Calliper Bleed Screw - 6.9-9.8Nm
Front Tie-Rod End to Tie-Rod - 69-98Nm, 51-72lb/ft
Front Tie-Rod End (Cotter Pin locked) - 31-44Nm, 23-33lb/ft
Flexible Brake Line to Fixed Brake Line - 12.8-21.5Nm
Front & Rear Flexible Brake Line to Calliper - 22-29Nm, 16-22lb/ft
Front & Rear Strut-Top nuts - 46-63Nm, 34-46lb/ft
Steering Wheel Centre Lock Nut - 39-49Nm, 29-36lb/ft
Steering Rack Mount Bushings (Type I & II) - 36-54Nm, 27-40lb/ft




Technical Data

Ignition Area:
Spark-plug gap: 1.0-1.1mm on 2.0 & 2.5
Spark plugs - 2.5: NGK ZFR5F-11 (standard), NGK ZFR6F-11 (for UK & USA)
Spark plugs - 2.0: NGK BKR5E-11 (standard), NGK BKR6E-11 (for UK & USA)
Ignition Timing - 2.5V6 - 10 +/- 1 degree; ECU modifies between 6-8o degrees.
Ignition Timing - 2.0I4 - 12 +/- 1 degree, not ECU modified (no knock sensor)
Cooling System Area:
Coolant Capacity - 2.5V6 - 7.5litres
Coolant Capacity - 2.0I4 - 7.0litres
Thermostat 2.0I4 & 2.5V6 - Initial-opening 80-84oC, full-open 95oC, full-open lift 8.5mm Fan operation temperature 2.0I4 - Approximately 97oC at the radiator cap filler neck
Fan operation temperature 2.5V6 - Approximately 100oC at the radiator cap filler neck
Fan Motor - 2.0I4 - MTX Single Speed, 5.8-7.6Amps, ATX Two Speed, 8.0-14.0Amps; 11.5-17.5Amps
Fan Motor - 2.5V6 - MTX Two Speed, 8.0-14.0Amps & 11.5-17.5Amps, ATX Two Speed, 7.9-13.9Amps & 13.2-19.2Amps
Water (Fan) Thermosensor - 2.0I4 - 91oC 1.70-1.84Kohm; 97oC 1.42-1.53Kohm; 108oC 1.03-1.11Kohm
Water (Fan) Thermosensor - 2.5V6 - 91oC 1.70-1.84Kohm; 97oC 1.42-1.53Kohm; 108oC 1.03-1.11Kohm

Oil System Area
Oil Capacity - 2.5V6 - Engine+Filter 4.0litres
Oil Capacity - 2.0I4 - Engine+Filter 3.5litres
Oil Dipstick L to F mark represents 1-litre
Oil Pressure Specs - 2.5V6 - 28psi @1000rpm, 49-71psi @3000rpm
Oil Pressure Specs - 2.0I4 - 57-71psi @3000rpm
HLA Wear Limit - 0.18mm, replace at 0.15mm (feeler guage between slowly-rotated cam & HLA)
MTX Oil Capacity - 2.7litres

General Specs 2.5V6
Valve Timing - Intake - Open BTDC - 8 degrees, Close ABDC - 50 degrees
Valve Timing - Exhaust - Open BBDC - 54 degrees, Close ATDC - 8 degrees
Bore & Stroke - 84.5mmx74.2mm, 3.33"x2.92"
Spec Compression - 9.2:1; pressure 203psi at 250rpm, min 142psi at 250rpm
Throttle Body - 2.5V6 - 60mm dia
Variable Resonance Induction System, VRIS
Engine Speed ........0-3250.......... 3250-4250 .......4250-6250 ..........6250-7500rpm
Shutter #1 ............. Closed .................Open .............Open ...................Closed
Shutter #2 .............Closed .................Closed ...........Open ...................Closed


General Specs 2.0I4
Valve Timing - Intake - Open BTDC - 8 degrees, Close ABDC - 47 degrees
Valve Timing - Exhaust - Open BBDC - 50 degrees, Close ATDC - 5 degrees
Bore & Stroke - 83mmx92mm, 3.27"x3.62"
Spec Compression - 9.0:1; pressure 171psi at 300rpm, min 119psi at 300rpm
Throttle Body - 2.0I4 - 55mm dia

Fuel System Area:
Fuel Pressure Regulator - 2.0I4 - 37-36psi
Fuel Pressure Regulator - 2.5V6 - 41psi
Max Pump Pressure - 2.5V6 - 72-92psi
Max Pump Pressure - 2.0I4 - 64-85psi
Injector Resistance - 2.0I4 - 12-16 Ohms at 20oC
Injector Resistance - 2.5V6 - 12-16 Ohms at 20oC

Power Steering Area:
Power Steering Fluid - ATF Dexron-II or M-III
Steering Wheel Free Play - 0-30mm

Front Brakes
Master Cylinder i.d. 23.81mm, 0.937"
Front Disc - Cylinder Bore - 57.15mm, 2.250"
Front Disc - Pad Dimensions - 4800mm^2 & 10mm thick
Front Disc - Dimensions - 258mm x 24mm (Probe/MX6 can be 264mm)
Rear Disc - Cylinder Bore - 30.16mm, 1.187"
Rear Disc - Pad Dimensions - 2900mm^2 & 8mm thick
Rear Disc - Dimensions - 261mm x 10mm
Power Brake Unit - MTX - 239mm, 9.4"; ATX - 188+215mm, 7.4+8.5"
Brake Pedal Lever ratio - 4.1, Max Stroke 125mm, 4.92"

Tyre Rotation - 6200 miles
Wheel Imbalance - max at wheel edge on 15" wheel - 9 grammes

Manual Gearbox Ratios
94 UK 626V6-2.5............................... 94 UK 626I4-2.0.........................................94 UK 626I4-1.8
1st - 3.307.......................................1st - 3.307..................................................1st - 3.307
2nd - 1.833......................................2nd -1.833..................................................2nd - 1.833
3rd - 1.310.......................................3rd -1.233..................................................3rd - 1.233
4th - 1.030.......................................4th - 0.914.................................................4th - 0.914
5th - 0.795.......................................5th - 0.717.................................................5th - 0.717
Rev - 3.166.......................................Rev - 3.166.................................................Rev - 3.166
Fin - 4.105........................................Fin - 4.105...................................................Fin - 3.850


In reality the 1993 cars are probably different in final drive & cam profile, as 1993 V6s had a tendency to put too much torque bias to the left-front. Even later cars still exhibit this tendency, torque steer should be neglidgible however.

Alignment
Front Wheel Alignment - Toe-in - 3mm +/-3mm
Front Wheel Alignment - Camber - MX6: -0o42' +/- 45'; 626: -0o36' +/- 45'
Front Wheel Alignment - Caster - MX6: 3o01' +/- 45'; 626: 2o37' +/- 45'
Front Left/Right differences - Camber: 30' max, Caster: 45' max
Rear Wheel Alignment - Toe-in - 3mm +/-3mm
Rear Wheel Alignment - Thrust Angle - 0o +/- 0.1o


VRIS System

Posted Image

RPM 0-3250 3250-4250 4250-6250 6250-7500
VRIS#1 Closed Open Open Closed
VRIS#2 Closed Closed Open Closed
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#2
blackshine007

blackshine007

    Mazda 626.net

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  • Car: 1994 626 LX KLZE
ECU Code Reading


ECU Code Readings

93-96 model cars - DIY reading is possible, OBD-I used.
93-96 UK cars - lack a Check Engine Light, CEL, but DIY code reading possible, OBD-I used.
96+ model cars - OBD-II capable reader is required.


For non-UK 93-96 cars with CEL:

Items required:
6" of cable, insulated, preferably solid core of 2.5mm^2.
Procedure
1. Open the hood/bonnet and locate the black oblong diagnostic connector behind the battery with "DIAGNOSTIC" printed in raised type on the top.

2. Opening this connector, inside the lid is a schematic of the connections. It is possible to scope O2 sensors and various other systems from here but we will be limited to code reading.
Locate the terminals "TEN" & "GND", notice there is a "B+" terminal nearby which is a 30A +12V feed from the battery and no loose strands of wire must touch it.

3. Ensure the ignition is off, the handbrake is applied and the gearbox is in Neutral or Park.

4. Take a piece of Insulated wire, approximately 2.5mm^2, and strip off 1/4"/0.5cm of insulation from each end. Form the wire into a loop about the middle to create a jumper-wire. Solid wire is preferred.

5. Connect this jumper-wire across the connections labled "GND" & "TEN". Ensure no other connectors are connected, and no strands are wandering about if stranded wire is used.

6. Turn the ignition to ON but do not start the car, watch the CEL as it flashes out any codes. If it does not flash confirm the connections, if it still does not flash then no codes have been stored by the ECU.

7. Codes are flashed out according to the lowest code first, and repeated after a pause of 4 seconds. The format is akin to morse code, in that a short flashes represent 1s and longer flashes 10s. Thus flashes of --- --- - - - - would represent a code of 24 for the (rear) oxygen sensor. Oxygen sensor failures are the most common cause of CELs.

8. To clear codes, disconnect the negative battery terminal for 2 minutes with a door left open or apply the brakes.

9. Turn the Ignition to OFF before removing the jumper wire, and ensure when removing the jumper wire no other connections are touched.

10. If more than one code is present, it can be worth clearing all codes and then checking them again to see which re-occur. It is not uncommon for sporadic codes to appear under certain fault conditions - so requiring them to come back as confirmation is strongly advised.


For cars without CEL (eg, UK cars):
Items required:
6" of cable, insulated, preferably solid core of 2.5mm^2.
A standard LED (Light Emitting Diode) & 1k-ohm resistor (soldered to the cathode/-ve of the LED) or a standard "12V LED".

Method
1. Open the hood/bonnet and locate the black oblong diagnostic connector behind the battery with "DIAGNOSTIC" printed in raised type on the top.

2. Opening this connector, inside the lid is a schematic of the connections. It is possible to scope O2 sensors and various other systems from here but we will be limited to code reading.
Locate the terminals "TEN" & "GND", notice there is a "B+" terminal nearby which is a 30A +12V feed from the battery and no loose strands of wire must touch it.

3. Ensure the ignition is off, the handbrake is applied and the gearbox is in Neutral or Park.

4. Take a piece of Insulated wire, approximately 2.5mm^2, and strip off 1/4"/0.5cm of insulation from each end. Form the wire into a loop about the middle to create a jumper-wire. Solid wire is preferred.

5. Connect this jumper-wire across the connections labled "GND" & "TEN". Ensure no other connectors are connected, and no strands are wandering about if stranded wire is used.


6. Connect the Anode/+ve of the LED+Resistor or 12V-LED to the B+ terminal, and the free resistor end (Cathode/-ve) to the FEN terminal. Ensure that nothing else is connected or accidentally connected as B+ is a 30A 12V supply.

7. Turn the ignition to ON but do not start the car, watch the LED as it flashes out any codes. If it does not flash confirm the connections, if still not flash then you have no codes stored.

8. Codes are flashed out according to the lowest code first, and repeated after a pause of 4 seconds. The format is akin to morse code, in that a short flashes represent 1s and longer flashes 10s. Thus flashes of --- --- - - - - would represent a code of 24 for the (rear) oxygen sensor. Oxygen sensor failures are the most common cause of CELs.

9. To clear codes, disconnect the negative battery terminal for 2 minutes with a door left open or apply the brakes.

10. Turn the Ignition to OFF before removing the jumper wire, and ensure when removing the jumper wire no other connections are touched.

11. If more than one code is present, it can be worth clearing all codes and then checking them again to see which re-occur. It is not uncommon for sporadic codes to appear under certain fault conditions - so requiring them to come back as confirmation is strongly advised.


Common Codes:

12 - Throttle Position Sensor.
Throttle Position Sensor failure usually accompanies poor or sluggish performance that is markedly poor. The sensor itself is a carbon track which can wear or fail resulting in voltage spikes. Such voltage spikes cause the ECU to go into "limp mode" substituting values for the TPS by interpolating other sensor data.
24 - Rear Oxygen Sensor.
Very common from 60k miles onwards, causing a reduction in fuel mileage due to slightly rich running. Replacements are 45ukp/55-60$US for Universal equivalents which splice into the old sensors connector, rising to 100-120$US for one with factory connector on it (if the old is not re-used).

#3
blackshine007

blackshine007

    Mazda 626.net

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Automatic (ATX) Gearbox Critical Maintenance


Primary Cause of ATX failure

o Insufficiently frequent ATX oil changes & overheating are the primary causes of automatic gearbox failure.
o ATX oil (ATF) should run at 175oF, every 20oF above that halves its lifetime - coolant temperatures quarter its lifetime. The gearbox oil is continually contaminated by the circulation of clutch-pack abrasive particles throughout the gearbox.
o Factory change intervals (600hrs) are too long compared to the high temperature service life (300hrs) of ATX oil.
o In slow moving traffic there is little or no airflow over the tiny factory cooler, and at the same time the thermal input into the ATX oil will be at it's greatest through normal torque-convertor slippage. At a minimum the factory should have implemented a slightly larger cooler with it's own temperature switched fan.
o The CD4E is a poor transmission, the 4EAT/GF4A-EL is a better transmission (fitted to V6s) but both have overheating problems.

Solutions

o Stage-1 - Improve Contaminant Removal
-- Annual ATX fluid changes
The factory specified interval of 2yrs/24,000 miles is too long.
An average speed of 40mph for 24,000 miles requires 600 hours of running, yet ATX gearbox fluid will degrade in GM THOT tests under 300 hours.
Thus the ATX fluid change interval should instead be 1yr/12,000 miles.

A Synthetic ATX fluid is available and withstands higher temperatures, but in view of the abrasive material contamination in ATX gearboxes it is better to use a non-synthetic oil annually than be forced through expense to leave a synthetic oil in for two years: clean oil is best. Clean oil can also markedly improve shifting & fuel economy.

-- Avoid Incomplete ATX fluid changes
Changing the oil on an ATX involves dropping the ATX oil pan and replacing the mesh filter. Unfortunately this only changes 3.8L of oil with 5L of dirty oil and abrasive particles still remaining in the torque-convertor & gearbox.
To change all 8.8L of oil requires the following procedure: two large 20L buckets, one with 10L of oil, the other empty; hoses to the ATX oil cooler are removed and extended into the empty bucket; the engine is started for 1 second and the hose ejecting oil is left in the empty bucket whilst the now identified oil-intake hose is moved to the bucket containing fresh oil; the engine is restarted and run until only clean oil exits. Two people are required and Dealers do not perform such a service as routine - it must requested. Complete oil changes will greatly extend the life of the ATX.

Complete oil changes as per the procedure above are DIYable, with a cost of 30$US versus 2500$US for a gearbox repair they should be considered mandatory.

-- Inline ATX Oil Filter
The mesh filter on the 4EAT ATX oil pan filters only to 200 microns. Inline ATX-specific filters can be fitted which filter down to 50-10 microns and so remove abrasive clutch material as it occurs rather than circulating it around torque-convertor, clutches, valve-body, oil pump. Traditional "spin-on filters" & adapters are available.

The CD4E transmission has a filter, but it is embedded deep inside the transmission for some reason known only to Ford. Thus it is very advisable to buy an external inline oil filter (eg, www.permacool.com) and do a complete fluid change annually. The transmissions are rated only slightly above the US AXOD Taurus transmissions, and so the use of cheapest-brand full-synthetic annually may be advisable since some problems are as much design as overheating related.

o Stage-2 - Improve Thermal Cooling
-- ATX fluid is used for lubrication, hydraulics (1,910 psi), cooling and actual transfer of power to wheels. With power transmission losses of 20% and 120kW available from the engine, up to 24kW largely in the form of heat must be removed by the ATX fluid & a tiny factory ATX cooler.
-- When ATX fluid is overheated or "burnt" it degrades to a brown colour and loses lubrication capability causing rapid transmission wear. Such breakdown of ATX oil through overheating can be sudden, is non-reversible and not readily obvious until catastrophic failure results.


o Oil Cooler Upgrade Choice
-- A) Hayden "Tube-&-Fin" Cooler
Avoid. The several pipe & U-bend tube-&-fin motorhome coolers offer inferior cooling in slow moving traffic, lower fluid flow. They are an old technology compared to even the stock factory oil-cooler. A tube-&-fin cooler must be much larger than the equivalent sandwich-plate cooler which has the disadvantage of reducing airflow through condenser & engine radiator hence factory radiators are of the sandwich plate design: greater cooling in a smaller package.

-- B) Hayden "Sandwich-Plate" Cooler Posted Image

Appropriate. Brand names Hayden Trucool/Rapidcool. Near factory-grade cooler providing high efficient cooling in a small package to maintain airflow through condenser & coolant radiator.
---- Hayden 7134711, 8" x 11", 3/8"-NPT inlet, cooler, 60$US
---- www.bakerprecision.com/trucool.htm

An alternative brand is B&M Automatic Transmission SuperCooler.

-- C) Setrab, Mocal, Earl "Sandwich-Plate" Cooler
Ideal. Whilst costing more, they are the factory grade solution chosen by marque the world over for their reliability, efficiency & compact size both in production & racing-team use.
---- Setrab # 616-6, 16-row, 4.75" x 13", 6AN fitting, cooler, 101$US
---- Setrab # 619-6, 19-row, 5.75" x 13", 6AN fitting, cooler, 115$US
---- www.bakerprecision.com/setrab.htm



-- D) Setrab, Mocal, Earl "Sandwich-Plate" Cooler with Fan & Thermostat
The real solution. The problem with all coolers is that they requires air to be flowing over the radiator. Crawling along for an hour in summer heat produces least air flow over the radiator when most is needed.

The solution is an oil-cooler with Fan & Thermstat, so making the maintenance of cooled ATX independent of vehicle speed even in stop & go traffic.

Posted Image
Posted Image
-- Smaller Mocal 115mm x 16-row Sandwich-Plate Cooler - 46.82
-- Fan housing for 115mm x 16-row - 20.05
-- Fan 119mm square, 12V - 22.05
-- Electric fan thermostat - 7.00


The cost-benefit is simple: 95.92 versus 1,800.00.
Costing little more than an oil change service, comparable to the many junk automative "improvement" products out there, and also goes a long way to negating the need for 8.8L of costly Synthetic ATX fluid.

-- A UK Supplier of Oil Coolers is www.thinkauto.co.uk.

o Oil Cooler Comparative Sizing:
-- To underline the undersizing of the stock ATX cooler, the Ford 1.8-engine uses a 24" x 4" ATX cooler, whereas the Mazda 2.5-engine ATX cooler is approximately 70% smaller yet must handle a nearly 50% bigger engine with 60% greater torque & thermal dissipation, and an ATX which is known to have overheating problems in itself.

Posted Image
-- The compact sizing of the sandwich-plate design can be seen.
Following this sizing the Mazda unit should be 12" x 10" in sandwich-plate, or an enormous 28" x 12" in the inefficient tube-&-fin design. Fitting a tube-&-fin cooler will reduce the cooling performance of the engine radiator & air-conditioning condenser.


Cooler Installation

o Hose clamps
-- Minaba hose clamps should be used on oil lines, particularly where maintenance for complete oil changes requires their removal & re-use. Minaba clamps use a double-band rolled-edge construction, no sharp band tails; never leak, clamp all around the hose without cutting it; re-usable. Stainless steel version are available.

o Cooler mounting bracket
Situate the ATX cooler in front of the coolant radiator to ensure low temperature air in slow moving traffic. Where a cooler is not mounted by pass-through plastic tags, it may be more ideally mounted to an aluminium L-angle from a hardware store or www.aircraftspruce.com. Aircraft Spruce offer 12"-multiple lengths of 2"x2"x1/8" 03-48400 at 2.20$US, 03-48500 1/4" at 3.60$US, T6061T6 aluminium.


Mazda Factory-Remanufactured Automatic (ATX) Gearbox
Posted Image
Mazda Factory-Remanufactured Automatic (ATX) Gearbox
A factory remanufactured unit is available from discount Mazda Dealers such as www.trussvillemazda.com. Trussville are ~2500$US with old unit as "core". Their benefit is that factory parts such as new cases are used if the original is out of spec, and the considerable design improvements from 1993-2000 are implemented. If sourcing a gearbox from elsewhere, ensure all updates are performed so you gain the (greater) reliability of the 2000 gearbox and enquire whether updated parts are available (stronger torque-convertor & Raybestos Blue clutches for example). Annual oil changes should be effected on any Probe/Mazda automatic gearbox as their cost vs repair is minimal.


Upgraded Automatic Gearbox Parts

o Upgraded parts for reliability & performance such as torque-convertors, clutch-packs, oil-pumps are available from Level-Ten or Protorque.
o Obviously before such upgrades, the first upgrade is cooling.

#4
blackshine007

blackshine007

    Mazda 626.net

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  • Car: 1994 626 LX KLZE
Rear Brake-Callipers - Design fault on build pre 5-Jan-95

Work-around - Short-lived, fix is rebuilt/new (Sumitomo redesigned).

Frequency - Most Probe/626/MX6 rear callipers stick circa 55k miles.


The Problem - Handbrake pivot-pin seal defect on rear calliper

The handbrake cable moves a spring/pivot-arm which operates the piston/brake-pads against the rotor. The pivot-pin sits in a needle bearing sealed into the calliper body by a rubber seal.
Design failure is seal deterioration allowing water ingress & corrosion. The handbrake is usually found unreleased or the caliper will not release on repeated heavy brake-application. The caliper must then be replaced with a new (redesigned) or rebuilt unit.
Lubricating the mechanism can release it and keep it operating for a time, but only as a short-term solution. Both front & rear caliper's must have their caliper guide-bolts lubed regularly with a high temperature anti-seize grease or the caliper will only brake one side of the rotor.

Solutions:

Short term:
Posted Image Posted Image
Unhook the handbrake cable from the pivot arm, spray WD40/penetrant around the area and work the pivot pin its entire range of movement. Then apply a waterproof grease (Castrol CL) to the area and work that in. It is possible on relatively new calipers to remove the pivot-pin & spring: in such cases replace the pivot-pin and seal, and thoroughly clean & lubricate the pivot-pin needle-bearing area.
Finding that lubrication is only a short-term resolution correlates with the cause being deteriorated rubber-seal & needle-bearing inside the calliper.


Regular use of the handbrake will help prevent the area seizing. Once the pivot-pin rubber seal and needle bearing inside have deteriorated, regular use/lubrication will not work in the long term.

Longer-Term Solution:

Warranty: See Dealer.

Ex Gratia: Ford-UK & Mazda-UK have contributed towards the cost of replacing failed calipers being aware of the problem. Refunds are not total, usually the cost of the caliper itself.
Ford UK statement: revised level caliper was fitted in production from 5-Jan-1995, and such parts may be fitted to earlier vehicles. This revised part is supplied as a matter of course now - since the seal/needle-bearing has been redesigned.

Trussville Mazda www.trussvillemazda.com supply remanufactured & new calipers are discounts to other Mazda dealers.


Symptoms:

Very hot rear wheel, speed falls back rapidly during gear-changes, deteriorating fuel mileage. If extreme, brake burning smell & glowing orange brake disc with the car being destabilised towards oversteer which the TTL suspension can't correct.

Complaints:

USA owners refused refunds should complain to the NHTSA (National Highway Transport Safety Association) at http://www.nhtsa.dot.../cars/problems/ with classification set to Brakes.
UK owners not refunded should complain to Ford/Mazda UK direct, who are aware of the problem and will instruct insomniac dealers to arrange refund of caliper-only costs.

#5
blackshine007

blackshine007

    Mazda 626.net

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  • Car: 1994 626 LX KLZE
Valve/Cam-cover gaskets

Pre-empt - Watch for oil-seepage into spark-plug holes.

Every 6 months after 50k miles remove ignition leads & plugs, cleaning both and to clean the spark-plug hole. Oil seepage that does occur is very minor into a non-draining cavity.
Cam cover bolts can be retorqued, but must not be overtorqued. Specification is a tiny 5.0-8.8Nm. Tightening procedure is start at the top-left of each cover and work to the right until the end, then back along the middle row to the left, then back along the bottom row to the right. Then for each cover retighten the two bolts between the three spark-plug wells.

The black valve/cam-cover gaskets themselves dry out and no longer have the required elasticity to gap-fill - the gasket does the sealing and not the torquing of the bolts. When the gaskets have dried out through age & thermal cycling they need to be replaced.


Symptoms

Oil in spark plug wells, oil wet ignition leads, stuttering and miss-firing. Middle spark-plug holes seem to be most susceptible since they are central regarding heat source & limited cooling.

Solution

Replace gasket; front is 1 hour labour or DIYable, rear is 4 hours labour. The rear requires removal of the aluminium intake and new intake gaskets must be fitted to avoid an ECU undetected lean condition at a cylinder. Gaskets are 20ukp/20$US from Mazda dealers. Silicone sealant dressing of the gasket is required and at four obvious points (when gasket is removed) and must not come into any contact with the camshafts or engine oil. Loose silicone can starve parts of oil, from HLAs to camshaft bearing journals.

#6
blackshine007

blackshine007

    Mazda 626.net

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  • Car: 1994 626 LX KLZE
Clutches

Pre-emptive - None, simply use non-OEM part.

Problem

New environmentally-friendly asbestos-free clutches are not as long lived as their previous asbestos versions. The choice appears to be chatter/judder as on some BMWs, or slippage as on our cars. The 2.5V6 coverplate clamping force is 1510 Newtons, just 27% uprating over the 2.0. Unlike asbestos clutches, the non-asbestos units can slip for many thousands of miles before failure.

Workaround

Aftermarket unit such as Centerforce Dual Friction Unit is designed for 90% uprated power but similar clutch pedal weight. It works by a dual-friction clutch-plate & centrifual weights which increase clamping force with RPM, preventing slippage problems.
ACT clutches require some clutch master cylinder rod adjustment, and do involve a heavier clutch pedal. Use of racing-puck clutches or clutches lacking take-up springs must be avoided since the shock loadings on bearings & gearbox will result in failure eventually. They are for racing use, and not road use.

Clutch specification is 225mm 8-7/8" single dry plate with 22x15/16 spline.

Replacement prices

Aftermarket US cost is around US$200-400.
Fitment labor is 4 hours, very often Mazda Main Dealers will be cheapest.

#7
blackshine007

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My ass is officially numb and so is my brain. I'll post more info later on today....... Hopefully

#8
mr8S1

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;) Excellent write-up! Good information.
What about adding some bolt and fastener information? Size, type and location? Hose and clamp diameters, etc..?
Thanks!

#9
ramqd

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Hello, I'm new here... just found this site.

Looks like a lot of good information. I was wondering if these specs are close or the same on the '02 I4? They sound pretty close, at least for the torque of the spark plugs which is what I was searching for.
Is there particular Anti-Seize you all recommend? I heard the copper additive is better for the aluminum block and will still work on steel blocks. This true?

I bought a used '02 for the wife and haven't picked up a service manual yet.
Thanks in advance for any reply or advice.

#10
Fredrick

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OMG. So much information here, but it's really helpful.

I am a newbie in car customization and modification. I really want to do this myself some day.




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